• Starting off the disco era in 1970, three researchers, A.J. Goldstein, A.B. Lesk, and L.D. Harmon, drastically improved automated facial recognition. Locations and measurements still needed to be computed manually but they now included analysis of 21 specific markers, including lip thickness and hair color.
  • Also in 1970, Dr. Joseph Perkell expanded upon the acoustic speech production model with the inclusion of the tongue and jaw in motion x-rays.
  • In 1974, the University of Georgia deployed one of the first commercial systems for hand geometry recognition. There were three primary purposes for this technology: time and attendance, personal identification, and physical access control.
  • In 1975, the FBI gave the NIST additional funds for the production of minutia scanners and extracting technology – leading to the development of a prototype reader. At that time, only a print’s minutiae was captured because digital storage came at a high cost. The NIST wanted to improve that, so over the next few decades they led developments in automatic digitizing of inked fingerprints. They also focused on image compression, quality, classification, data extraction, and matching. This all culminated in the development of M40, the FBI’s first operational matching algorithm.
  • In 1976, Texas Instruments released the first prototype speaker recognition system. It was rigorously tested by the U.S. Air Force and the MITRE Corporation.
  • In 1977 a patent was awarded to Veripen, Inc. for a Personal Identification Apparatus that was used to acquire dynamic signature information. The device could measure pressure and eventually led to the testing of automatic handwriting verification.