For Adrienne Denaro, creator of the BagsID brand voice and our Global Communications Director, the world is an exciting place full of beauty, history and amazing people. From live music to visiting exotic places, upcycling unloved furniture to writing for the most well-known international brands – there’s hardly anything she doesn’t find enjoyment doing. To her, it’s about looking at everything with a filter of positivity – even during difficult periods of time, like the COVID-19 pandemic:

“The last year has been challenging for the entire world. I try to look at it positively because, in the overall grand scheme of things, we didn’t suffer like a lot of other people,” Denaro explains when asked about the pandemic. “I like to look at the silver linings that have come out of all of this. Many companies are remote now, which allows them to find talent anywhere in the world. Just look at BagsID – we are headquartered in the Netherlands and have team members in the U.K., U.S. and India. We cover every time zone and we’re still a small team considering the global impact of what we work on. I think that’s exciting.”

Denaro started her communications career as a copywriter. She went on to win multiple awards, writing for recognizable corporations like Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines, HSN, Perry Ellis International (and their over 35 fashion brands), Verizon, Macy’s, Just for Men, T.J. Maxx and more. Now, not only does she write for BagsID but she oversees PR and media relations, too. Reflecting on her successful career, she finds humor in her all-too-often misunderstood title.

“I’m a copywriter – I don’t do copyrighting. I don’t put the little “C” on things,” she explains, referring to the legal © symbol placed on copyrighted intellectual property versus ‘copy’ – the words in advertising and marketing materials. “I am the voice of brands, so when you read a lot of our content, that’s me being BagsID. I give companies a personality and make them sound more conversational.”

She’s handled copy and communications for vastly different industries, from travel to retail, fashion to telecom, CPG (consumer packaged goods) to F&B (food and beverage). After working at these brands, she branched out on her own and started a freelance business. That’s when she was approached by BagsID.

“I’m attracted to global and national brands that already have a stake in the game. To be approached by a startup was a little unnerving. But when I heard what BagsID was doing, I was like ‘oh my god this is going to be a global player, this is going to change the way we travel. I need to be a part of that and help make this happen.’ I looked at BagsID as not some little bootstrappy startup but already as a global player… because that’s what we are going to be.”

As far as the conversational, sometimes playful but always professional brand voice she created for BagsID, she had this to say:

“BagsID is the most different. It is a new voice for a brand new technology. I take things that are really complicated, especially with what we’re doing with photo recognition, AI and deep learning, and make it understandable for the layman. We’re not just talking to the backend folks – we’re talking to marketers and CEOs who may not be up to speed on complicated lingo but need to understand what our technology does.”

Despite how entertaining her job sounds, it is a huge responsibility too. Representing global brands, making sure what they’re saying is not just conversational and understandable but truthful and factually accurate, is high pressure. You have to think like a marketer and a lawyer simultaneously. To all writers and professionals of any kind, she has this advice:

“If it was fun, they wouldn’t pay you to do it. You need to dig in and earn your keep. We’re all told to follow our passion, which is important and true. Do what you love. But remember there are going to be times that will be difficult, a lot of things are going to be on your plate. We are all remote now and that’s great, but because technology is moving faster, we’re also expected to do a lot more with our limited time. Find what you love so you enjoy it but remember there’s a reason you’re getting paid for it.”

Writing is also a creative field, like design and art direction. They’re two sides of the same coin, especially in the ad world. About this, she had to say:

“So many people are told to think outside the box – many creatives, writers and designers, work in the same bubble and most hate being told that. But I love it. If you put me in a box, with a lot of challenges and parameters, where it almost feels like you have no room for creativity, that’s when the creativity is going to shine. That’s when you’re going to look at something from a different point of view because it’s not an easy task. So, I say ‘put me in a box so I can think outside of it.’”

Her final interview question was the same one we give all our featured colleagues: Describe your role in 10 words. Being a wordsmith, she accomplished it on the first take: “I write stuff to make it more understandable for you.”

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